Sustainability Solutions Café

John Willis - Sustainability Solutions Cafe - May 18

John Willis
Professor and Photographer, Marlboro College
Thursday, May 18
12:30-1:30
Haldeman 041


“Collaborating with Lakota People”

John Willis, a photographer who splits his energy between his own photography, teaching in colleges and creating collaborative socially based educational community engagement will present on his long time work with Lakota people, creation of the Exposures Cross Cultural Youth Arts Program www.exposuresprogram.org/ and work with the resistance movement against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Sponsored by the Porter Family Fund for Sustainability in the Curriculum and the Studio Art Department at Dartmouth.

Free and Open to the Public.

Áslaug Ásgeirsdóttir - Sustainability Solutions Café - May 17

Will Marine Spatial Planning Save the Oceans?

Áslaug Ásgeirsdóttir, Department of Politics, Bates College       
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
5:00-6:00 PM
101 Fairchild

The oceans are getting crowded as energy production, aquaculture, and related industries move offshore, increasing competition with traditional uses like shipping and fishing. Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) can help us use ocean space efficiently, but, as Ásgeirsdóttir explains, it can only be sustainable if we recognize its limits.

Sponsored by the Porter Family Fund for Sustainability in the Curriculum.

Free and open to the public.

Phanem-anon: Celebrating Indigenous Women and Leadership - May 4-5

Phanem-anon: Celebrating Indigenous Women and Leadership - May 4-5

We invite the Dartmouth community and the public to join in the conversation with Jennifer Rose Denetdale (dine), Winona LaDuke (Ojibwe), Mililani Trask (Kanaka Oiwi), and Ellen Gabriel (Mohawk).  Their involvement in indigenous resistance movements include DAPL, the Keystone XL Pipeline, Indigenous gender issues, Treaty rights, history, the United Nations Declaration of Rights of Indigenous peoples, and more. Please join the Native American community at Dartmouth in welcoming these extraordinary women, while engaging in opportunities to bring awareness to prominent indigenous issues.

Thursday May 4 – Steele 006

Alex Scalfani ’18 & Madison Sabol ‘18 - Sustainability Solutions Café - May 3

Sustainability Solutions Café with Alex Scalfani ’18 and Madison Sabol ‘18
Wednesday, May 3, 2017
5:00-6:00
B03 Moore

Our Civic Responsibility: Reflecting on the People’s Climate March

What does it mean to be an engaged citizen? How are Dartmouth students acting upon this role? In these tumultuous political times, it is more important than ever to be informed and active in representing environmental and social justice interests. In this talk, Madison and Alex will reflect on their experience at the People’s Climate March in DC on April 29 in respect to their background as environmental studies majors. In the words of Terry Tempest Williams, “Action is the antidote to despair.” Choosing to grow into our civic responsibilities may take us out of our comfort zone, but is essential for our personal journeys as agents of change.

Sponsored by the Porter Family Fund for Sustainability in the Curriculum.

Brooke Williams - Sustainability Solutions Cafe - April 13

Brooke Williams
Sustainability Solutions Café
Thursday, April 13, 2017
4:30 PM
006 Steele

Provoking Evolution. What if at our essence, we are biological organisms focused on passing life onto the future, and that our main work is to discover how the planet might make the best use of us?

Join us as Brooke Williams presents from his new book, Open Midnight: Where Ancestors and Wilderness Meet.  Reception and book signing hosted by the Norwich Bookstore after the event.

Open Midnight weaves two parallel stories about the great wilderness—Brooke Williams’s year alone with his dog, ground truthing backcountry maps of southern Utah, and that of his great-great-great-grandfather, William Williams, who in 1863 made his way with a group of Mormons from England across the ocean and the American wild almost to Utah, dying a week short. The story follows two levels of history—personal, as represented by his forbear, and collective, as represented by Charles Darwin, who lived in Shrewsbury, England, at about the same time as William Williams.

Sarah Susanka - Sustainability Solutions Café, April 5

Sarah Susanka
Acclaimed Architect, Thought Leader, and Inspirational Speaker
2017 Ethics Dorsett Fellow/Sustainability Solutions Café
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
041 Haldeman

12:00-1:30 pm    Lunch presentation and Discussion “Reinventing our Homes and Communities for Aging Independence” – Registration required at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~ethics/conferences/index.html.

4:30-5:30 pm     Annual Dorsett Fellow Lecture and Sustainability Solutions Café “Not So Big: The First Step in Sustainability for Home, Community, and Life”

5:45 pm                Reception and Book Signing

Sarah Susanka's "Not So Big" message has become a launch pad for a new dimension of understanding—not just about how we inhabit our homes, but also about how we inhabit our planet and even our day-to-day lives.

Sponsored by the Ethics Institute, cosponsored by the Porter Family Fund for Sustainability in the Curriculum and Osher at Dartmouth.

Josh Fox Movie Screening hosted by Terry Tempest Williams - April 28

How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things Climate Can’t Change

Join Oscar-nominated Director Josh Fox and host Terry Tempest Williams for a special film screening at Dartmouth on the 100 cities tour!

Thursday, April 28
4:30-6:30 PM Film
6:30-6:45 PM Q&A with Film Maker Josh Fox
006 Steele Hall
Reception to follow in the Fairchild Tower under the Globe

In How to Let Go of the World and Love All The Things Climate Can't Change, Oscar Nominated director Josh Fox (GASLAND) continues in his deeply personal style, investigating climate change – the greatest threat our world has ever known. Traveling to 12 countries on 6 continents, the film acknowledges that it may be too late to stop some of the worst consequences and asks, what is it that climate change can’t destroy? What is so deep within us that no calamity can take it away?

http://www.howtoletgomovie.com/

Free and Open to the Public.

Riding for Climate Justice - May 3, 2016

Riding for Climate Justice on the Road to UN Climate Negotiations
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
5:30 PM - Reception outside Steele 006
6:00 PM - Talk begins
Steele 006

Morgan Curtis ’14, Youth delegate to COP21 in Paris
David Goodrich ’74, Former Director, UN Global Climate Observing System, NOAA

David Goodrich ’74 finished a career in climate science and rode from Delaware to Oregon in 2011. Four years later, Morgan Curtis ’14 set off on a 6 month storytelling journey to COP21, the UN Climate Conference. The climate advocates, who graduated 40 years apart, now work together as part of Dartmouth Alumni for Climate Action. They will share stories and lessons from their journeys, how climate change plays into current political problems, and the role of phasing out fossil fuels in building a just and stable future.

Free and Open to the Public.

Changing Climate, Changing Minds Seminar - April 8-9, 2016

April 8-9, 2016

 “Changing Climate, Changing Minds,” a seminar at Dartmouth College with Terry Tempest Williams, James McCarthy, Sally Bingham and David Loy

Click Names Below to View Videos

Click HERE to view the poster - Art & Design by Amy Y. Zhang '17
Click HERE to read the follow up article in the Valley News.

Sustainability Solutions Café - October 26, 2015

See the video of the presentation on Dartmouth You Tube.

Read the article in The D.

“The Only Viable Future: A Greener Food System and a More Equitable World”

Ricardo Salvador, Director of the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Monday, October 26
4:30 – 6:00 PM
Kemeny 008

Ricardo Salvador serves as the senior scientist and director of the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. The transition from our current food system to one that produces healthy food requires the employment of sustainable and socially equitable practices. Dr. Salvador works to answer questions regarding these changes. How do we get the most out of our farmland while preserving the integrity of the soil, water, and ecosystem? How can we make healthier food more affordable and available to communities?

Reception immediately following the talk.

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