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Kēhaulani Kauanui – Sept 30 - George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture Series

 “Settler Colonial Logics in Claims to ‘the Commons’ and ‘Public Lands’ from Magna Carta to Mauna Kea: An Indigenous Critique”

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui
Monday, September 30
4:30-5:30 pm
Steele 006

Advancing an indigenous critique, this presentation critically engages calls to “reclaim the commons” and/or protect “public lands” in settler colonial contexts as they adversely impact indigenous peoples, all while making a bid for “universal values.”  Showing how indigenous contestations over land reclamation and protection challenge constructions of both “the commons” and “public lands” as property claims within structures of non-consensual domination, the talk offers a decolonial appraisal for ethical and political consideration.

Andrew Curley - May 13 - George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture Series

Please join us for the George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture!  This is the third lecture in the series focused on Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science.

Andrew Curley, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of Geography

“What is a Resource Curse? Energy, Development, and sovereignty in Native North America”

Monday, May 13, 2019
4:00-5:15 p.m.
006 Steele

Kyle Whyte - April 3 - George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture series

Please save the date for the George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture!  This is the second lecture in the series focused on Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science.

Kyle Whyte, Timnick Chair in the Humanities and Professor in the departments of Philosophy and Community Sustainability at Michigan State University

Is Time Running Out to Stop Climate Change? The Problems and Possibilities of Acting "Urgently" in an Unjust World

Wednesday, April 3, 2018
3:30-4:00 Snacks and Conversation
4:00-5:00 Lecture
041 Haldeman

Zoe Todd - March 4 - George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture series

Please join us for the George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture!  This is the first lecture in the series focused on Indigenous Environmental Studies and Science.

Dr. Zoe Todd, Department of Sociology and Anthropology & the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies, Carleton University

"Fish, fossils, fuel: kinship and claiming in Alberta's petro-economies"

Monday, March 4, 2019
3:30-4:00 Snacks and Conversation
4:00-5:00 Lecture
Haldeman 041

Abstract: This talk explores relationships between fossils, fish, fuel, and kinship in the context of settler petro-politics in Alberta, Canada. Exploring case studies of settler extraction of bituminous deposits in Northern Alberta, and scientific expeditions in the storied Burgess Shale in neighboring British Columbia, I examine how settler ontologies imagine and position the very ancient nonhuman beings whose fossilized remains subtend the Alberta economy.

“Climate Change Progress Post-Paris: Is the U.S. Still In?” October 30

Click here to view the recordig of Ken's talk.

The George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture

“Climate Change Progress Post-Paris: Is the U.S. Still In?”

Kenneth Kimmell
President of the Union of Concerned Scientists
October 30, 2017
7:00 PM
Filene Auditorium, Moore Hall

Ken Kimmell is president of the Union of Concerned Scientists, a leading science-based nonprofit that combines the knowledge and influence of the scientific community with the passion of concerned citizens to build a healthy planet and a safer world. Mr. Kimmell has more than 30 years of experience in government, environmental policy, and advocacy. He is a national advocate for clean energy and transportation policies and a driving force behind UCS’s “Power Ahead” campaign to build a large and diverse group of clean energy leadership states.

Michael Pollan - October 24, 2016

The George Link Environmental Awareness Lecture/Food Day Keynote

Michael Pollan
Monday, October 24, 2016
7:00 PM
Grand Ballroom, Hanover Inn

(doors open at 6:00 pm)

Followed by a book signing hosted by the Norwich Bookstore.

Pollan’s books about food, diet, and industrial agriculture — he is perhaps best known for 2006’s “The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals” — have made him an influential voice in America’s food fight over obesity, nutrition, and diabetes, and have made him revered by those who believe that something is fundamentally wrong with how we mass produce and prepare our meals.

The George Link Jr. Lecture - April 21, 2015

The George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture

“Sustainable Revolutions: The Quest for Real Food and Wine in the 21st Century”

Deirdre Heekin
Tuesday, April 21, 2015
7:00 PM
105 Dartmouth Hall

Deirdre Heekin is a Vermont farmer, restauranteur, grape grower and wine maker. She will read passages from her new book, An Unlikely Vineyard: The Education of a Farmer and Her Quest for Terroir (Chelsea Green Press) interspersed with commentary on “How we can feed the world and be sustainable?” and “How Dartmouth undergraduates might examine their own journey in relation to sustainable agriculture after they leave Dartmouth?”

A book signing at 8:00 PM will follow the lecture.

Free and open to the public.

La garagista Farm and Winery, Barnard, VT
http://www.lagaragista.com/

For more information, please contact Kim Wind at [email protected] or call 603-646-2838.
 

Majora Carter- The George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture

"Hometown Security and Environmental Equality" 


Thursday, May 2, 2013
7:00 PM
Filene Auditorium, Moore Hall


Majora hosts the Peabody Award winning public-radio series: The Promised Land. She has a long list of awards and honorary degrees, including a MacArthur “genius” Fellowship. She founded Sustainable South Bronx in 2001 when few were talking about “sustainability”; and even fewer, in places like The South Bronx. Since 2008, her consulting company, The Majora Carter Group, has exported Climate Adaptation, Urban Revitalization, and Leadership Development strategies for Business, Government, Foundations, Universities, and economically under-performing Communities.


Sponsored by the Dartmouth College Environmental Studies Program, the Porter Family Fund for the Sustainability Minor, and the Tuck School of Business and MBA Program Office.
Free and Open to the Public.

Laurie Marker _ The George Link Jr. Environmental Awareness Lecture

Dr. Laurie Marker, Founder and Executive Director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund
"Saving the Wild Cheetah: A Race to the Future"
Thursday, May 3, 2012
7:00 PM
Filene Auditorium, Moore Hall


The oldest and most unique of all the big cats in Africa, the cheetah is the fastest land mammal reaching speeds of up to 70 mph. But the cheetah is in a race for its future. Mankind has brought the cheetah to the edge of extinction. The wild population of these magnificent cats is thought to be less than 10,000 today. Based in Namibia, host to the largest population of wild cheetah, the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) has worked for the last 20 years to save the cheetah. Dr. Laurie Marker, who is the world’s leading expert on cheetahs, sold everything she owned in 1990 and started CCF. Dr. Marker discussed non-lethal farming methods, CCF's award winning Bushblok and The Livestock Guarding Dog programs.